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vertical impact rod mill formula

handling shaft deflection, runout, vibration, & axial motion

handling shaft deflection, runout, vibration, & axial motion

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vertical antennatheory - wc7i

vertical antennatheory - wc7i

If you are one of those who can not remember a darn thing about your high school algebra, fear not. I will do all the math and I will be happy if you just nod your head and say things like " That is what I thought.", or "I knew that", or "Sure, that makes sense." All you really need to do is to remember the conclusion of the discussion, and I will make that clear by using big or dark words.

OK, you say, but what do I do with the .7272 feet? How do I convert that to inches? You can convert parts of a foot to inches by multiplying that part of a foot by 12, and then add the 32 feet later.

OK, you say, but what do I do with the .602 feet? How do I convert that to inches? You can convert parts of a foot to inches by multiplying that part of a foot by 12, and then add the 1 foot later.

First, lets start with the flow of electrons in to and out of the vertical radiator. It is true that an antenna will radiate a RF field with a very poor ground. That RF field will be far weaker than it needs to be. The thing that creates the RF field is the flow of electrons up and down the vertical radiator. The more electrons that flow, the stronger the field. In order to get the greatest number of electrons to flow up and down the vertical radiator, you need to have a very low resistance storage area full of electrons. When a rig provides a voltage at the antenna, the lower the resistance, the more electrons will flow. The larger the storage area, the more electrons that can be forced up into and back down out of the vertical radiator.

Now I need to stop right here and warn you about the following information. The following information is one of the most controversial subjects ever discussed by amateur radio operators around the world. The only other subject that is full of incredible controversy is Standing Wave Ratio, or SWR, which I have written about later in this website, but not yet.

The controvery happens because amateurs have built vertical antennas with buried radials, and they have worked pretty well. The usual thought is that " since it works, I did it right." That is not the truth. It is possible that you could have done a much better job if you understood the theory of how a buried radial antenna works. I have a first hand example. Some years ago, I installed a buried radial vertical antenna for my friend Duane (SK). I used heavy copper braid for the radials and used two radials tuned for each band of operation. The antenna worked fine for years, even though I was unaware at that time that buried radials lose all their tuning when buried. I should have put down lots more and longer radials for a more efficient antenna.

Ground rods work better than no ground at all, but even though they have a low resistance, they do not have much storage area for electrons. The ground rod is surrounded by dirt, which is a very poor conductor.

These questions are very tricky and many amateurs have a poor understanding on what is needed. The internet is full of different information from different sources. Lots of emotion and arguments have resulted from the lack for good information.

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