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classifiers, screens and sieves - gold fever prospecting

classifiers, screens and sieves - gold fever prospecting

Gold recovery tips: Screening off larger worthless gravel and rocks with a sieve is a fast and efficient way to improve your panning and sluicing results. Classifying (sizing) your material to the proper dimension is also essential to any successful fine gold recovery operation. Remember, for best results reduce the size of your material to the approximate size of the gold you expect to recover, and you will increase your gold recovery rates greatly.For gold panning: try panning material bigger than 20 mesh separately from material smaller than 20 mesh. 20 mesh (window screen sized material) is the typical point where gold panning becomes difficult for most people. Trying to recover fine flour gold from quarter inch large gravel is quite a chore. Panning the material when similarly sized will be much more efficient.Blue bowl fine gold recovery: did you know the blue bowl is designed to work with a 30 mesh or smaller classifier?Gold Spiral wheels: the biggest mistake we see people make is not screening their material to similar size before processing. There is a huge difference between quarter inch and window screen sized material. Run your material in like sized batches and enjoy much greater productivity and efficiency.

bucket sieve classifier - gold fever prospecting

bucket sieve classifier - gold fever prospecting

1/2" 1.4mm OPENING 1/4" 0.95mm 1/8" 0.6mm 1/12" 0.45mm 1/20" 0.35mm 1/30" 0.3mm 1/50" 0.17mm 1/70" 0.14mm 1/100" 0.1mmProper classification of material by size is the key to more efficient gold separation. This is true for roughing out your material, all the way to the final step of fine gold separation. Using a sieve works for panning, sluicing and high banking equally well.Many of our customers use the 30, 50, and 100 mesh sieve sizes with their Blue Bowl concentrators. A # 8 mesh sieve is required for using a Gold Cube Concentrator.We are often asked: How many sieve sizes do I really need?Well, it depends on your material and how comfortable you are with your recovery equipment. If you are going to prospect for gold seriously and as more than an occasional hobby, you will want to have several different mesh sizes.For a typical stream sluice you would usually want to use at least a (# 4) 1/4 inch sieve unless you have large nuggets. No sense dumping worthless large rocks and gravel into a sluice if there is no gold that big. Go smaller if you have only fine gold where you are working. A good compromise is often a # 8 mesh sieve. Not too big and not too small in case you have pickers. Always give at least a quick glance at your water gravel and rock - you never know when a large nugget might pop up! Panning out large gravel is pretty easy and fast too. Fine flour gold is another story.Fine gold can be really tough to pan out. Most new gold panners begin to struggle on fine gold smaller than 20 mesh (window screen). Make it much easier by panning your paydirt concentrates in batches. Pan anything bigger than 20 mesh (window screen size) separately, then pan the smaller material that fell through your sieve. Repeat this for the other sieve sizes. There is a big difference between a 100 mesh screen and a 20 mesh screen. The material may look similar to the naked eye but it behaves quite differently in your pan. Reducing the material to the size of the gold you are trying to recover will make your panning a lot easier.Separating and processing your gold concentrates by size with a classifier sieve makes gold recovery much more efficient and less laborious.

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